Video 17 Sep 896 notes

(Source: grandefilms)

Photo 17 Sep 528,088 notes rincrocker:

this is so fucking useful wHY IS IT NOT GOING FULL BLAS EVERY WHERE JESUS CHIRST

rincrocker:

this is so fucking useful wHY IS IT NOT GOING FULL BLAS EVERY WHERE JESUS CHIRST

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

Video 17 Sep 64,447 notes

angryfemin-ish:

laughatthestars:

today, my school hosted an exhibit for suicide awareness day. the exhibit included 1,100 backpacks in representation of the number of lives that are lost to mental illness each year on college campuses. many of these backpacks were donated by the families that lost loved ones and had their stories attached. i’m so proud of my school for bringing attention to such a serious issue.

this matters so much. 

Photo 17 Sep 5,023 notes humansofnewyork:

"Before I went to the protest that day, I stood in front of a picture of the Dalai Lama, and I swore an oath: ‘If I am arrested, I will not give the names of any of my friends.’ They put me through eight months of interrogation. They burned cigarettes on my face. They made me stand in ice for four hours, until my skin froze into the ice, and then they pushed me forward. They gave me electric shocks on my tongue. They told me they were going to kill my father and mother. After eight months, I had a trial. Two guards stood next to me when I testified, and they hid electric shocks in my sleeves in case I said something they didn’t like. I was sentenced to four years. Sometimes I’d get so hungry I’d eat toothpaste. And sometimes I’d get so thirsty, I’d drink my urine. When I finally got out, I weighed 39 kilograms."
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"Before I went to the protest that day, I stood in front of a picture of the Dalai Lama, and I swore an oath: ‘If I am arrested, I will not give the names of any of my friends.’ They put me through eight months of interrogation. They burned cigarettes on my face. They made me stand in ice for four hours, until my skin froze into the ice, and then they pushed me forward. They gave me electric shocks on my tongue. They told me they were going to kill my father and mother. After eight months, I had a trial. Two guards stood next to me when I testified, and they hid electric shocks in my sleeves in case I said something they didn’t like. I was sentenced to four years. Sometimes I’d get so hungry I’d eat toothpaste. And sometimes I’d get so thirsty, I’d drink my urine. When I finally got out, I weighed 39 kilograms."

(Dharamshala, India)

Photo 17 Sep 252 notes henleydesigns:

Pro-Ject & Box Design.

henleydesigns:

Pro-Ject & Box Design.

via @Bcast_Md.
Quote 17 Sep 8,932 notes
Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.
Photo 17 Sep 1 note
Photo 17 Sep 101 notes wehadfacesthen:

Marcello Mastroianni in La Dolce Vita (Federico Fellini, 1960)

wehadfacesthen:

Marcello Mastroianni in La Dolce Vita (Federico Fellini, 1960)

Video 17 Sep 276,233 notes
Photo 17 Sep 121 notes laughingsquid:

Eye-Popping Moiré Pattern Paintings by Anoka Faruqee

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